Ultimate Bass

Tackling Small Waters by Boat

Here’s part 2 of how I tackle catching bass in small waters. This time we are taking to the water. I will not talk about techniques to catch bass in this article, but just talk about a different way to get to the bass, especially in highly pressured bank fished ponds.

Here’s part 2 of how I tackle catching bass in small waters. This time we are taking to the water. I will not talk about techniques to catch bass in this article, but just talk about a different way to get to the bass, especially in highly pressured bank fished ponds.

As I mentioned in a previous article, boat ramps are almost non-existent in the small water in my area, so what is the solution? We use small 1 and 2 man inflatable boats.

Only 3 years ago, almost everyone fished for bass in these small waters by bank fishing, but in only a very short period of time, a lot of these same anglers are now getting out onto the water. For obvious reasons, these small inflatable boats are much cheaper than other boats like aluminum and fiber glass, but in small waters, they are much more at home than their bigger counterparts.

With the smaller size of our waters there is no need for 150 and 200 horse powered outboards so most of these anglers fit a simple 30 pound thrust hand controlled trolling motor to get to where they want to be, but as we move forward, more and more accessories for these small boats are becoming more readily available. These accessories include;

1. Depth and fish finders

2. Rod holds that may hold up to 6 rods on each side

3. Stronger mount brackets to hold motors up to 6hp without a transom

4. Front detachable boards that hold a full foot controlled trolling motor

These boats are also good for storage as once they have been deflated they fit inside a zipped bag which can be stored in the trunk of a car or in the cupboard at home. They are very sturdy on the water, standing, casting and playing fish can be done easily. Due to the design of these boats, they can easily move though water less than 12 inches deep getting you into parts of the water inaccessible by other bigger boats.

The only downfall I have found is because they are so light, a strong wind can blow them quickly from a good fishing spot, but this can be quickly overcome with the use of a good but small anchor.

See you ON the water,

Steve Bell, catching bass in Korea.



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